Open Letter to the PM

Updated: Oct 1, 2020

A Brief Summary

To whom it may concern,


The economic recovery from COVID-19 presents what is being called a once-in-a-century opportunity by scientists, economists and environmental activists alike. An opportunity to set Australia on the path towards a fair and financially beneficial renewable energy transition.


My name is Nicola Allen. I am a 15-year-old environmental activist, the editor of the newsletter which I founded, Green News, and I have written an open letter to the government in order to convince them to take this opportunity in both hands and take Australia into the future with leadership and bold vision. This letter is Project Sunset, named for the fact that gas is a sunset industry. Please take five minutes out of your day to read it, then share, with the accompanying photos, on your favourite social media platform to spread the message to everyone!


I believe in the power of democracy. Together, we can yet use this opportunity to change Australia's energy future.


Good Luck!


Nicola Allen

(You can write to me at green.news.australia@gmail.com)

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The Main Letter

Dear Mr Morrison,


My name is Nicola Allen, and I am fifteen years old. I wrote the open letter below because I wanted to share my concern about the government's plans for a gas-led recovery from COVID-19. After discovering these plans, I spent a month of intensive research, gathering all the information I could upon the subject, and this is the final product - entirely my own work, entirely without coercion, financial backing or plagiarism. I decided to take on this massive project not only because it is extremely interesting, but because I have a deep love for nature and a passion for solving environmental problems. I hope you can spare a few minutes of your precious time to read this.


All the major scientific groups are in agreement that the climate crisis is real, human caused and requires urgent action - NASA, the IPCC, the CSIRO, Australian Academy of Sciences, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, the WHO, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, also called NOAA - the list goes on. There have been seven independent studies into the scientific consensus on climate change since 2004, the last in 2015. The mode, or most common score, is 97%.


COVID-19, the novel coronavirus, is having devastating impacts on economies and workers all around the world, and we're heading into a terrible economic recession, even here in Australia. Paradoxically, this could be the start of the energy revolution. We have an excellent chance to turn the climate change ship around and repair the damage caused by decades of lobby-group and fossil fuel-driven inaction, by making huge new investments in renewable and green technology. Across the globe, there is an increasing amount of support for an environmentally sustainable, economically beneficial and humanitarian approach to recovery from the coronavirus, supported by scientific and economic studies which prove the viability of renewable energy and other green technologies as solutions to the climate and coronavirus crises. Because in this pandemic, expert advice has been lifesaving. Now it is time to listen to the climate experts as well.


A report released by the CSIRO in June 2017, called, 'Low Emissions Technology Roadmap,' said in its key findings that, "Australia is endowed with some of the world’s best energy resources, has good skills in low emissions technologies, strong institutions and strong trading relationships with key consumers of energy. These advantages leave it well placed to benefit from a domestic and global transition to low emissions energy." This shows that we are advantageously positioned to make the transition to renewable energy, and don't have any resource-related excuses for not doing so.


In May 2018, a report was released by the International Labour Organisation, a branch of the United Nations, titled, 'World Employment and Social Outlook 2018: Greening with jobs'. We learn from this report that by 2030, a shift to a green economy would create 24 million new jobs. It states, "Environmental sustainability can be compatible with decent work, especially when the institutional and policy tools adopted to promote decent work complement measures to advance a sustainable, low-carbon and resource-efficient economy." In other words, when governments support a green energy transition, good working conditions are more likely to be achieved. So, jobs and working conditions are not major problems facing the transition, either.


This year, as some countries start to get back on their feet, coalitions of groups have formed, pushing for green economic stimulus and recovery - in Australia, for example, the Business Council of Australia and the Australian Conservation Foundation have created an unlikely alliance, along with many other organisations. They are supported by various studies and papers, such the recently released Ernst and Young report, which was commissioned by the WWF. Its findings are very encouraging: a green economic recovery, led by renewables, would create nearly 3 times more jobs than a fossil-fuel-led one; fast-tracking the renewable projects already underway in Australia, along with other low-cost measures, could create 58,000 new jobs in the construction industry; focussing on five more key areas, including transport and the subsidisation of solar and hydro, could create an additional 46,000 jobs; and many more people, in rural tourist hotspots hardest hit by the virus, could be employed in the conservation sector, doing jobs such as pest control and helping wildlife recover from the bushfires, 70% of which would require no expertise.


A few months ago, 200 English business leaders signed an open letter to the British government, in which they said, “Measures that cut greenhouse gas emissions and stimulate the economy have the potential to be more effective in supporting jobs and economic growth. They'll also support our long-term climate goals and deliver better outcomes in other key areas of public interest, such as public health and wellbeing. Investments in projects such as building renovation, offshore wind, electric vehicles, environmental improvements and low carbon industrial clusters have the potential to bring investment and job creation across multiple regions of the UK." While this refers specifically to the United Kingdom, its message is also relevant for Australia, and the rest of the world.


Oxfam has also joined the movement, publishing a briefing paper called, 'AUSTRALIA’S ENERGY FUTURE & THE RECOVERY FROM COVID-19: How we can help end poverty and fight the climate crisis,' which states that, "A renewable energy powered recovery can create a brighter future for all Australians and ensure we play our part in ending poverty worldwide. Doubling down on fossil fuels, like coal and gas, can only bring harm to Australians and to communities everywhere."


The IEA report released in June this year, written with the International Monetary Fund and simply titled, 'Sustainable Recovery,' says, "…governments have a unique opportunity today to boost economic growth, create millions of new jobs and put global greenhouse gas emissions into structural decline." An excellent summary of what I hope for the future. The IEA's plan, which it says it has constructed, "In response to calls from governments around the world," seems to be all-encompassing, and provides for nearly every aspect of energy usage in society, as well as current and predicted economic conditions for a transition taking place mainly in the next three years, and the effects of the pandemic. Therefore, it seems only sensible for governments everywhere to heed their advice as thoroughly as possible.


In light of all this, one would expect the Australian government to lead the way in the renewable energy transition, following the advice of scientists, environmental groups and economists. After all, Australia has always been regarded as a global beacon of progress, since Federation. But unfortunately that is not what is happening, and that is why I have written this letter. The government's plan relies heavily on carbon-intensive manufacturing and massive subsidies for the gas industry in particular. While gas is about half as polluting as coal, framing it as a 'transition fuel' is a mistake, because at the end of the day we won't need any fossil fuels in the future. The gas industry is embedding itself in the system for the long term, not helping Australia or the climate. Bruce Robertson, a financial analyst for gas and LNG at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA), says that due to an ongoing global gas glut where prices have dropped through the floor, "Australia can’t develop an industry when that industry itself is telling us that it can’t develop without significant subsidies… I don’t think that it serves the national interest. It does serve the gas industry’s interests." The government has planned to spend our precious recovery money on subsidies to the gas industry, rather than following the advice of the scientists and investing in renewables, conservation and energy efficiency.


This excerpt from the Oxfam report describes the problem with Australia's gas plan: "Stacked with people linked to fossil fuel companies or interests, leaked documents from the Government’s National COVID19 Coordination Commission have suggested the Government underwrite a huge expansion of Australia’s gas industry. Meanwhile, the draft Technology Investment Roadmap places a similar emphasis on gas and ignores Australia’s responsibility to respond adequately to the challenges of climate change. In this briefing we present a broad range of arguments against attempting a gas-fired recovery and in favour of a renewable energy powered recovery."


When calculating the cost of continuing to use fossil fuels, we also have to factor in the cost of the climate catastrophes they cause. For example, our recent black summer bushfires here in Australia cost a staggering $100 billion. The 2018 California wildfires cost $350 billion. The ongoing floods in the Ukraine, which have decimated 2 to 3 hundred mountain villages, are blamed on climate change and logging and are expected to cost the Ukrainian government millions, on top of the economic burden of the pandemic. According to the International Monetary Fund, "Over the past decade, direct damages of such disasters are estimated to add up to around US$ 1.3 trillion (or around 0.2% of world GDP) on average, per year." Should Australia still be subsidising the fossil fuel industry $11 billion a year? Although we don't contribute much to global emissions, we are one of the highest emitters per capita, meaning that the only reason our emissions are low is because our population is small. How can we expect developing countries to get on top of their sometimes massive emissions which are driven by their populations, when we won't lift a finger to cut our relatively small ones, and we have the technology, infrastructure and money to do so?


Over the past few decades, differences along party lines have sparked fierce political debates in Australia and led to social polarisation spurred on by the lobby groups which have successfully delayed any real action. Judith Brett, an Emeritus Professor of Politics at La Trobe University, wrote, in an article for The Conversation, "Because we are rich in coal and gas, Australia has been plagued with two decades of wars over climate policy. The wars have claimed three prime ministers: Kevin Rudd, Julia Gillard and Malcolm Turnbull." So, it is understandable that the climate is a touchy subject in Parliament. But that is no excuse to avoid climate action.


The lobby groups have infiltrated both major parties, and only with a bi-partisan, green economic recovery plan which focuses on renewables can we hope to defeat them and climate change, and set an example for the rest of the world. My generation is already facing unprecedented challenges for the future, and it is crucial that our leaders, such as yourself, use the allocated recovery funds wisely in funding renewable energy projects, instead of simply propping up the gas industry.


The government's response to the COVID-19 crisis has been, in general, outstanding, with low infection and mortality rates and strict social distancing measures immediately being put into effect. I was particularly impressed by the calm and efficient briefings which you have been giving daily, Prime Minister, and the extraordinary measures which have been taken to support the economy and your fellow Australians. This is what a country in crisis would expect from its government. Can the government now show the same leadership and decisive action on the global and ultimately more devastating climate change crisis, which is already taking its toll on developed countries like Australia, and has been ravaging developing countries for decades? The bushfire season wasn't a good look for the government, but this can be remedied by doing that which no one would expect but many would welcome: establishing effective climate policies and following them up with real action, including supporting those communities who are still suffering from the bushfire season and waiting for economic stimulus. What this country needs now is a strong government like yours which will take the helm with bold vision and steer us out of this triple crisis of climate, bushfires and corona.


I trust that you are able to see vested interests for what they are, and that you will listen to those who wish only the best for Australia.

Sincere Regards,

Nicola Allen


Cover Letters

Standard opening sentences

Dear _____,

My name is Nicola Allen, and I am fifteen years old. I wrote the open letter attached to this email because I wanted to share my concern about the government's plans for a gas-led recovery from COVID-19. After discovering these plans, I spent a month of intensive research, gathering all the information I could upon the subject, and this is the final product - entirely my own work, entirely without coercion, financial backing or plagiarism. I decided to take on this massive project not only because it is extremely interesting, but because I have a deep love for nature and a passion for solving environmental problems. I have decided to send it to a number of people, including all members of the current ministry, because it is relevant to your various responsibilities and areas of expertise.

(Insert individual letter.)

Please take the time to read this letter to the Prime Minister which explains why a gas-fired recovery is inadvisable and what must be done to ensure a safe future for everyone.


Warm Regards,

Nicola Allen


(Please be advised that this is only the first batch - the most important politicians. Most of the others don't have cover letters. Some of these below have been repeated because the politicians have similar roles in this issue.)


Ken Wyatt - Minister for Indigenous Affairs

As minister for Indigenous Affairs, you represent the Indigenous people of Australia in Parliament. As I am sure you know, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are not only particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change, but have been campaigning against the construction of many fossil fuel power plants around Australia for many years.

I understand that there are a range of difficult circumstances facing Aboriginal people in Australia, particularly those living in remote communities. This leaves them more vulnerable to natural disasters than the rest of the population, not only from the direct impacts of natural disasters, but also because food and water supply chains can be cut off in flood and fire seasons, which are made worse by climate change, and diseases can spread more quickly.

As I came to truly appreciate during another research project last year, on the Uluru Statement From The Heart, Aboriginal culture is rooted in a symbiotic relationship with the land. As such, it is natural that so many Aboriginal people have become environmentalists. Seed, a national aboriginal youth group, fights for climate justice by making their voices heard. Here is a quote from their website: "Low-income people, communities of colour, women, youth and in particular Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia are on the frontlines of this crisis. It’s our communities that are hit first and worst, not only by the impacts of climate change but the impacts of extractive, polluting and wasteful industries that are devastating our country and fuelling the climate crisis." I find their action incredibly inspiring as a young environmentalist myself, and I receive their newsletter.

More specifically related to the subject of my letter, Aboriginal communities have fought against many gas projects over the years, where their land rights are not recognised or are extinguished and the land is destroyed. It is so different to the incredible respect with which Aboriginal people have treated this country for millennia. For example, for the past few years, plans have been made to extract the Northern Territory's natural gas through fracking. This proposal, urged on by the Coalition, was first permitted in 2018 and has met with violent opposition from the Aboriginal people of the region. At the time of the approval, Seed's director said, "The Gunner Government has betrayed the people of the Northern Territory and Aboriginal communities by allowing fracking companies to poison our water, land and climate." Aboriginal people have also opposed the Adani mine in Queensland and oil drilling in the GAB, which was recently cancelled due to financial unviability.

By supporting the fight against climate change, you will also be further supporting the rights of Indigenous Australians.

Josh Frydenberg - Treasurer

As Treasurer you take charge of the financial considerations of the Australian government. Therefore, this letter should appeal to you, as it focusses on the economic viability, among other things, of renewables and fossil fuels, and explains why we simply cannot afford to be left in the dust while other countries snatch the new economic opportunities presented by a renewable energy transition. Our financial and climate-related aims are so harmonious that it is a wonder that people still seem to think that massive taxes and a financial crisis would be inevitable. Your government needs to support the coming transition, to avoid massive job losses and financial collapse, and that includes carbon taxes and cutting the $11 billion dollar annual fossil fuel subsidies. Whatever the cost, you can be sure that the costs of dealing with climate change down the track will be higher.

Michael McCormack - Deputy PM, etc.

As far as I understand, your role in this renewable energy transition, is quite singular, as you are not only the Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development, but also the Deputy PM. It is your job to help the Prime Minister choose the right path out of this crisis, and that path should be founded on renewable energy.

However, as Minister for various other things, you also have other responsibilities. Infrastructure, transport and regional development are all key areas in which a renewable transition is both necessary and beneficial. Instead of constructing new fossil fuel power plants, oil rigs and roads, we should be focussing on cutting the $11 billion dollar subsidies to a dying fossil fuel industry and supporting the growth of renewable energy projects such as the Kidston solar project in outback Queensland, which is bringing back jobs to a ghost gold mining town and providing power for thousands of homes. Excellent, efficient new infrastructure and massive regional development all in one.

On the subject of transport, you are probably aware of the fact that we have passed peak car use in Australia. The relentless building of new roads is short sighted, and electric public transport, such as the newly installed Sydney Light Rail, as well as cycling and walking, should be supported. The construction of bike paths and racks, and the closing of roads to create squares and pedestrian streets in cities, will help to encourage these forms of transport. Consider the regreening of cities and the restoration of parks and canals as opportunities to increase the carbon sequestration of cities. I was amazed when I read about and saw photos of the dramatic transformation in South Korea, of the Cheonggyecheon canal, which had been covered with a highway, and was repaired by a visionary mayor who brought back the green heart of Seoul with stunning results.

Dan Tehan - Minister for Education

As I see it, there are three main climate-related aims which fall under the portfolio of the department of education. The first is ensuring that the government position on climate change is clear and decisive, and supported by evidence. For the past few decades, the Australian government has swayed between vague climate aims and weak policies which have done next to nothing to reduce our carbon emissions or advance our renewable energy industry. In addition, the government's perspective has shifted from one of unequivocal action to denialism and now to acknowledgement without the action. Politicians like yourself must show leadership and aid the implementation of concrete solutions, while educating the public as to why they are necessary and important. Pseudoscientific organisations have been spreading misinformation around the world for decades, especially in Australia and America, and it will take a lot to counteract the negative perceptions many people have of renewable energy and climate policy. That's where your department comes in. You must combat these perceptions and educate the public while taking real action against climate change.

The second objective should be to address systemic problems inside schools to do with climate science. Some teachers, especially science and maths teachers, who understand the problems better than most, currently feel that to discuss climate change or possible solutions in indisputable terms would be seen as influencing children's political views, rather than educating them on climate. In other words, if a child tells their friends in class that climate change is a government conspiracy, the science teacher who overhears this is powerless to tell them that they are wrong. Children should be free to ask questions and get a completely correct, scientific and definite answer from teachers, while teachers should not face the threat of angry parents demanding to know why their child is being taught 'extremism'. Would a teacher correct a student if they said that the earth was flat or that the Holocaust didn't happen? Of course they would. In fact, if possible one might go even further to actively increase the amount of climate-related content in the school curriculum - after all, it is being called the greatest crisis humanity has ever faced.

Thirdly, we school children would ask for your sympathy, at the bare minimum, concerning the school strikes. I found your remarks around the movement to be unhelpful. Have you ever tried to strike on the weekend minister? That's not a strike, that's a protest, and we've had plenty of those over the years, to no effect. We have no choice. Do you think we want to be missing school and exams and rebelling against our parents and teachers? No. It's a sacrifice which we have to make - after all if politicians won't make a stand for our future and won't listen to the science then why should we stay in a classroom where teachers can't even refute climate denial? We don't expect you to condone our actions, just not to condemn them. If you've read the reports, watched the documentaries, and seen the evidence of climate change, then examined what exactly the government has been doing about it, there is no way you can find our actions unjustifiable.

Sussan Ley - Minister for the Environment

While of course you have received this letter primarily because you are the Federal Environment Minister, there is one other point I would like to address. In July, the interim report from the review of the nearly 21-year-old 'Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999' (EPBC Act) was released. The review is chaired by Graeme Samuel, and the report stated that, "Australia's natural environment and iconic places are in an overall state of decline and are under increasing threat. The current environmental trajectory is unsustainable." I need not remind you that the report went on to describe the ineffectiveness of the Act in protecting threatened species or that cumulative environmental harm has not been addressed, or that state and federal coordination is both laborious and insufficient. I know that you have promptly replied to the report and taken steps to improve the efficiency of Australia's environmental laws, saying that, "This is our chance to ensure the right protection for our environment…" This immediate reaction was encouraging.

However, I was disappointed to see that the government did not consider it necessary to appoint an independent regulator to make sure the laws take effect and really work to protect our threatened flora and fauna'. This concerned me because while having the right policies in place is a start, the government needs to go further to ensure that these laws are taken notice of and are strictly enforced. For the last 20 years, Australia's environment has suffered because of a lack of adequate regulation and enforcement. But you have the power to show leadership and change that.

Linda Reynolds - Minister for Defence

I sent this letter to you, minister, because while it makes no mention of the military, climate change is an issue which I believe everyone should be acutely aware of. It may even prove to be a threat to national security. When people talk about climate change, the last thing they think of it the Defence Force. However, there is a surprising link between military conflict and climate-related disasters, particularly in developing countries. As far back as 2007, then UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon was talking about 'climate wars.' A study from 2009 titled, "Warming increases the risk of civil war in Africa," stated that, "We find strong historical linkages between civil war and temperature in Africa, with warmer years leading to significant increases in the likelihood of war. When combined with climate model projections of future temperature trends, this historical response to temperature suggests a roughly 54% increase in armed conflict incidence by 2030, or an additional 393,000 battle deaths if future wars are as deadly as recent wars." This is due to the fact that increased temperatures can lead to drought, causing wars to break out over access to food and water, among other things. Many studies have been conducted since then, one of the latest by Denver University in 2019, and although there are factors which are more likely to result in war in the short term than climate change, it will likely prove to be a serious long-term security threat. A study from earlier in 2019 by the International Committee of the Red Cross studied patterns of violence related to climate in Mali, an African country which is part of the Sahel region, which is warming 1.5 times faster than the rest of the world and is thus more vulnerable to the effects of climate change. The ICRC's president, Peter Maurer, remarked that climate change "adds a complicating layer in a region where underdevelopment, endemic poverty, widespread criminality and violence already make life so fragile." Mali's death count in 2018 was more than five times higher than 2016, and this was found to be due to limited resources being fought over by farmers, such as food, land and water.

While these conflicts are in general restricted to developing countries, as the climate crisis continues to escalate these patterns of violence may begin to spread to our shores.

I am sure that you are already aware of these threats, but I would like to bring them to your attention once again, to remind you that no matter what walk of life we come from, climate change is relevant to us all. I am a cadet of the AAFC of two years, so I, like you, can appreciate, to some extent, the military's unique ethos. From this common ground, I implore you to consider climate change as a serious threat to national security, and help scientists and activists like myself to bring about greater public awareness of climate change, and more concrete government policies to deal with it.

Darren Chester - Minister for Defence Personnel and Veterans' Affairs

While my letter makes no mention of the military, climate change is an issue which I believe everyone should be acutely aware of. It may even prove to be a threat to national security. When people talk about climate change, the last thing they think of it the Defence Force. However, there is a surprising link between military conflict and climate-related disasters, particularly in developing countries. As far back as 2007, then UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon was talking about 'climate wars.' A study from 2009 titled, "Warming increases the risk of civil war in Africa," stated that, "We find strong historical linkages between civil war and temperature in Africa, with warmer years leading to significant increases in the likelihood of war. When combined with climate model projections of future temperature trends, this historical response to temperature suggests a roughly 54% increase in armed conflict incidence by 2030, or an additional 393,000 battle deaths if future wars are as deadly as recent wars." This is due to the fact that increased temperatures can lead to drought, causing wars to break out over access to food and water, among other things. Many studies have been conducted since then, one of the latest by Denver University in 2019, and although there are factors which are more likely to result in war in the short term than climate change, it will likely prove to be a serious long-term security threat. A study from earlier in 2019 by the International Committee of the Red Cross studied patterns of violence related to climate in Mali, an African country which is part of the Sahel region, which is warming 1.5 times faster than the rest of the world and is thus more vulnerable to the effects of climate change. The ICRC's president, Peter Maurer, remarked that climate change "adds a complicating layer in a region where underdevelopment, endemic poverty, widespread criminality and violence already make life so fragile." Mali's death count in 2018 was more than five times higher than 2016, and this was found to be due to limited resources being fought over by farmers, such as food, land and water.

While these conflicts are in general restricted to developing countries, as the climate crisis continues to escalate these patterns of violence may begin to spread to our shores.

I am sure that you are already aware of these threats, but I would like to bring them to your attention once again, to remind you that no matter what walk of life we come from, climate change is relevant to us all. I implore you to consider climate change as a serious threat to national security, and help scientists and activists like myself to bring about greater public awareness of climate change, and more concrete government policies to deal with it.

Christian Porter - Attorney-General and Minister for Industrial Relations

As Attorney-General, you oversee the Australian legal system and your department is responsible for reviewing new laws before they can be passed. Over the last few years, it has become more and more apparent that legal measures are often the most effective when it comes to dealing with environmental problems. These cases are helped by laws which value environmental stability over profit, such as those which prevent the logging of old-growth forests or the draining of vital river systems. I would ask you to show leadership in this area by encouraging such laws and protecting us from those which allow people to destroy our planet's life support and climate mitigation systems for corporate growth. You are an intelligent, practical man so I am sure you understand that in order to avoid a climate catastrophe, every country in the world must support the environment with an ecologically-minded, ethical legal system.

You are also minister for industrial relations, another big and important portfolio, encompassing work health and safety and workplace relations policies, as well as coordination with labour unions and agencies, etc. I imagine it is an incredibly difficult job which requires years of experience in law, politics and negotiation. If the government were to actively support the national transition to renewable energy, hopefully coming out of the COVID-19 pandemic (further details in main letter), you will be responsible for making sure that those people who currently work in the fossil fuel industry in Australia find new jobs on wind farms, in solar factories or at hydro plants. No one, least of all environmental activists, wants these people to lose their jobs, after all. I heard Tim Flannery give a speech in which he said that a coal miner once asked him how he could leave his job when he needed to support his family, and Flannery replied that of course, you couldn't. But what some people don't seem to realise is that, for a whole range of reasons, fossil fuels are giving way to renewables around the world anyway, and the only difference is if the government supports the transition rather than denying that it's happening, it won't happen fast enough to stop climate change, and people will be left in the dust of the industry without a new job. (Again, I discuss this in more detail in the letter.) Therefore, I simply remind you - because you no doubt are already aware of this - that the department of Industrial Relations, and that of the Attorney-General, both have important roles to play in the coming transition.

Marise Payne - Minister for Foreign Affairs and Minister for Women

I write to you in both your ministerial capacities - those of Foreign Affairs and of Women - for both are relevant to my letter, though not adequately explained. In my understanding, the Minister for Foreign Affairs is in charge of managing relations with other countries. During my research I have begun to realise that women in politics tend to be pioneers in their field. You were the first female federal president of the Young Liberals, and after that the first female Minister for Defence, before becoming the Minister for Foreign Affairs. It seems fitting, then, that you are also the Minister for Women.

When it comes to dealing with climate change, the department of Foreign Affairs has a vital role to play. For example, reducing greenhouse gas emissions on a global scale requires international cooperation and negotiation, whether that means attending a climate conference across the world or travelling a shorter distance from home to Pacific Island Nations. The recent conference which occurred there was disappointing for many people, as it revealed that the Australian government was not willing to budge on the coal industry, and instead our Prime Minister avoided the questions and tried not to make any promises. The Prime Minister of Tonga was reduced to tears because his people, and others, are in real and present danger from climate change, due to rising sea levels and increased storm activity. The islands are, in total, responsible only for 0.03% of global emissions, compared to Australia at approximately 1.07%. So although us cutting our emissions through a renewable energy transition wouldn't make a huge difference, it would be a show of solidarity with our neighbours which, if you look at the figures, could be achieved without creating economic meltdown. We are also experiencing climate change's sting in Australia, thanks to our last bushfire season, and the ongoing drought, so I am asking you, minister, to please help Australia create a more concrete climate policy and take action.

Another fact which I would like to remind you of is that climate change disproportionately effects women, particularly in developing countries, as they are often burdened by children and are more likely to live in rural areas and in poverty, making them more vulnerable to natural disasters.

Alan Tudge - Minister for Population, Cities and Urban Infrastructure

In your capacity as Minister for Population, Cities and Urban Infrastructure, you have a number of vital roles to play in the transition to renewable energy and other green technologies. While many cities will remain relatively similar to how they look now, a number of necessary changes will have to take place, which will contribute to the decarbonisation and increased sequestration of our society. The first is the gradual waning in car usage. This will happen in its own time, and only needs to be assisted by the gradual integration of more pedestrian routes and public transport. Then, buildings must be altered to maximise carbon sequestration and minimise carbon output. We also need new buildings to be constructed to maximum energy and resource efficiency, including proper insulation. Where possible, they should include rooftop and hanging wall gardens. If all new buildings had these we could suck quite a bit of CO2 out of the atmosphere and reduce our overall urban carbon footprint, just with these few small adjustments to the system.

As the grid begins to radically increase its use of renewable energy in Australia - which it will have to do - everything that uses the grid, including electric public transport, will transition with it. But, we aren't there yet, so instead of waiting, you can encourage investment in new solar technologies which can power buildings directly.

On the subject on transport, you are probably aware of the fact that we have passed peak car use in Australia. The relentless building of new roads is short sighted, and electric public transport, such as the newly installed Sydney Light Rail, as well as cycling and walking, should be further supported. The construction of bike paths and racks, and the closing of roads to create squares and pedestrian streets in cities, will help to encourage these forms of transport. Consider the regreening of cities and the restoration of parks and canals as opportunities to increase the carbon sequestration of cities. I was amazed when I read about and saw photos of the dramatic transformation in South Korea, of the Cheonggyecheon canal, which had been covered with a highway, and was repaired by a visionary mayor who brought back the green heart of Seoul with stunning results.

Simon Birmingham - Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment

Being the Minister for trade, tourism and investment, this letter is extremely relevant to you. Our country is dependent on the revenue we receive from coal mining, and the mineral is one of our major exports. However, these fossil fuel exports make us indirectly responsible for many more emissions than we produce here in Australia. I am sure you know that, in the inevitable global transition to renewable energy, we cannot continue to rely on coal as such a massive export. When it comes to exporting fossil fuels with large, 'carbon dioxide-emissions potential,' an August 2019 report by the Australia Institute placed Australia third in the world behind Russia and Saudi Arabia. (Just behind us are the USA, Indonesia, then Canada.) That's not exactly what you would expect from a country as vast and rich in renewable resources as Australia. Now, I know that we also export natural gas, which helps, arguably, to reduce emissions in countries which would otherwise use more polluting fossil fuels, according to the CEO of APPEA (Australian Petroleum Production and Exploration Association). But we have to find alternatives to the coal exports.

In May this year, a study from the Grattan Institute suggested that we should turn to the 'green steel' industry instead - steel manufacturing which is powered by renewable energy and has the potential to generate tens of thousands of jobs, 'comparable' to those in the coal industry. Here is an encouraging quote: “A range of clean energy industries could plausibly provide hundreds, or even thousands, of new jobs in Australia. But very few can plausibly provide tens of thousands of jobs, comparable to the number in [Australia’s] key coal mining regions. Green steel is the exception… Australia’s abundant solar and wind resources are well suited to making hydrogen, the key energy input to making green steel from renewable energy. And Australia’s lower-cost green hydrogen will make it a better place to produce green steel than places like Japan or Indonesia… Significant investment – almost $A200 billion in today’s dollars – would be required for Australia to produce almost 7 per cent of the world’s green steel. This amount of investment is large, but is much less than the $350 billion invested in Australia by the oil and gas industry in the past decade alone… the economic prize is substantial. The annual output of a green steel industry of this scale would be about $65 billion in today’s dollars. This is only slightly smaller than the value of Australia’s export coal industry today.” Therefore, I hope that you will consider leading Australia away from coal as our major electricity source and export.

As for tourism, climate change is already having a severe impact on the tourism industry here in Australia. Of course, due to the bushfires, regional communities who depend on visitor and tourist revenue to maintain their local economies are suffering. Tourism, being our fourth biggest export earner, is a vital part of the Australian economy, and climate disasters such as bushfires are taking their toll - the recent black summer is expected to cost the sector hundreds of millions. The impact of coral bleaching in Great Barrier Reef is also significant. You would, of course, be aware of these figures, and I trust that you will take them into account. COVID-19 coming directly after the bushfires as it did shows that economic stresses can unexpectedly pile up at any time. This will continue to happen more frequently with climate change. We must prepare for the future, but we must also do everything in our power to prevent such disasters from happening again.

Michaelia Cash - Minister for Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business

As Minister for Employment, you should appreciate this letter for its focus on the feasibility of a renewable energy transition in relation to jobs. The government is adamant in its commitment to protecting jobs and livelihoods, and I hope that all ministers can understand that to achieve this end we do not need the continued support of the fossil fuel industry.

As the government begins to actively support the national transition to renewable energy, hopefully coming out of the COVID-19 pandemic (further details in main letter), you will be responsible for making sure that those people who currently work in the fossil fuel industry in Australia find new jobs on wind farms, in solar factories or at hydro plants. No one, least of all environmental activists, wants these people to lose their jobs, after all. I heard Tim Flannery give a speech in which he said that a coal miner once asked him how he could leave his job when he needed to support his family, and Flannery replied that of course, you couldn't. But what some people don't seem to realise is that, for a whole range of reasons, fossil fuels are giving way to renewables around the world anyway, and the only difference is if the government supports the transition rather than denying that it's happening, it won't happen fast enough to stop climate change, and people will be left in the dust of the industry without a new job. (Again, I discuss this in more detail below.)

Also being the Minister of Skills, Small and Family Business, climate change is relevant to your portfolio because it is often the small businesses which suffer the most in natural disasters and the financial recessions they can cause. For example, in the recent Black Summer bushfire season, small businesses suffered all over Australia from a lack of tourism, if not the direct impacts of the fires themselves, making them even more vulnerable to the effects of the current pandemic. I am sure that you are already aware of these facts, and I hope that going forward you will help to encourage the renewable energy transition and other action against climate change.

Angus Taylor - Minister for Energy and Emissions Reduction

As you are the Minister for Energy and Emissions Reduction, this letter is extremely relevant to you and your department. It is very important that you consider all available options to address the challenges of climate change. I trust that you are open to different positions than that which the government has taken on climate policy and the economic recovery from COVID-19.

Mathias Cormann - Leader of the Senate and Minister for Finance

As Minister for Finance you take charge of the financial considerations of the Australian government. Therefore, this letter should appeal to you immensely, as it focusses on the economic viability, among other things, of renewables and fossil fuels, and explains why we simply cannot afford to be left in the dust while other countries snatch the new economic opportunities presented by a renewable energy transition. Our financial and climate-related aims are so harmonious that it is a wonder that people still seem to think that massive taxes and a financial crisis would be inevitable. Your government needs to support the coming transition, to avoid massive job losses and financial collapse, and that includes carbon taxes and cutting the $11 billion dollar annual fossil fuel subsidies. Whatever the cost, you can be sure that the costs of dealing with climate change down the track will be higher.

Peter Dutton - Minister for Home Affairs

While my letter makes no mention of the military, climate change is an issue which I believe everyone should be acutely aware of. It may even prove to be a threat to national security. When people talk about climate change, the last thing they think of it the Defence Force. However, there is a surprising link between military conflict and climate-related disasters, particularly in developing countries. As far back as 2007, then UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon was talking about 'climate wars.' A study from 2009 titled, "Warming increases the risk of civil war in Africa," stated that, "We find strong historical linkages between civil war and temperature in Africa, with warmer years leading to significant increases in the likelihood of war. When combined with climate model projections of future temperature trends, this historical response to temperature suggests a roughly 54% increase in armed conflict incidence by 2030, or an additional 393,000 battle deaths if future wars are as deadly as recent wars." This is due to the fact that increased temperatures can lead to drought, causing wars to break out over access to food and water, among other things. Many studies have been conducted since then, one of the latest by Denver University in 2019, and although there are factors which are more likely to result in war in the short term than climate change, it will likely prove to be a serious long-term security threat. A study from earlier in 2019 by the International Committee of the Red Cross studied patterns of violence related to climate in Mali, an African country which is part of the Sahel region, which is warming 1.5 times faster than the rest of the world and is thus more vulnerable to the effects of climate change. The ICRC's president, Peter Maurer, remarked that climate change "adds a complicating layer in a region where underdevelopment, endemic poverty, widespread criminality and violence already make life so fragile." Mali's death count in 2018 was more than five times higher than 2016, and this was found to be due to limited resources being fought over by farmers, such as food, land and water.

While these conflicts are in general restricted to developing countries, as the climate crisis continues to escalate these patterns of violence may begin to spread to our shores.

I am sure that you are already aware of these threats, but I would like to bring them to your attention once again, to remind you that no matter what walk of life we come from, climate change is relevant to us all. I am a cadet of the AAFC of two years, so I can appreciate, to some extent, the unique ethos of the Defence Force. You, Minister, were a member of the Queensland Police for nine years, and I imagine that this ethos is similar - protecting Australian citizens, from internal and external threats. From this common ground, I implore you to consider climate change as a serious threat to national security, and help scientists and activists like myself to bring about greater public awareness of climate change, and more concrete government policies to deal with it.

David Littleproud - Minister for Agriculture, Drought and Emergency Management

As the Minister for Agriculture, Drought and Emergency Management, it is extremely important that you understand the role of climate change as a driver of the disasters that your department deals with. I trust that you are willing to consider all solutions in regard to climate, and a way forward which doesn't exacerbate the problem.

Karen Andrews - Minister for Industry, Science and Technology

I have been particularly impressed by your contribution to the political field of Australia, and encouraged by your acceptance of climate science and determination to get on with doing something about it. Being the Minister for Industry, Science and Technology puts you in a special position to represent the most innovative and scientific people in Australia, and advocate for a renewables-led recovery from the current crisis. No doubt you are already endeavouring to do this.

Keith Pitt - Minister for Resources, Water and Northern Australia

As Minister for Water, you no doubt are very aware of the impacts of climate change, as it increases the risk of droughts and catastrophic flooding. In order to protect our water reservoirs and river systems - many of which suffered in our last drought, ending in the bushfire season - we must address climate change, and that means taking action with concrete policies.

You are also minister for Resources and the Northern Territory, so I would like to remind you that there are controversial gas fracking projects being proposed there at this moment. These, urged on by the Coalition, were first permitted in 2018 and have met with violent opposition from the Aboriginal people of the region. At the time of the approval, Seed's director said, "The Gunner Government has betrayed the people of the Northern Territory and Aboriginal communities by allowing fracking companies to poison our water, land and climate." I therefore hope that you will consider leading the Northern Territory away from gas and towards renewable resources. The government is already committed to 50% renewables by 2030, and net-zero emissions by 2050, (incidentally the kind of targets which would be welcome from the federal government) and it is that kind of positive change which should be encouraged. For example, the government's 'Renewable Hydrogen Strategy,' unveiled in July this year, focusses on making the most of the NT's abundant natural renewable resources. The NT is also home to what will be the world's biggest solar farm, the 'Solar Cable' project. Please help these initiatives to flourish so that the NT can lead the way for the rest of Australia. I note that you have, of late, been enthusiastic about fossil fuels, and have suggested that investments in these outmoded technologies are needed to drive down energy prices. But renewables are outpacing fossil fuels on the global market at breathtaking speed. Besides, we have to plan for the future. Whatever the cost of a renewable energy transition, you can be sure that the costs of dealing with climate change down the track will be higher.

Greg Hunt - Minister for Health and Assisting the Prime Minister for Public Service and the Cabinet

I am writing to you in your capacity as Minister for Health. As you are no doubt aware, the impact of climate change and related factors on health is severe. A 2019 report from the Global Health Alliance Australia said, “Australia and neighbouring countries in our region are experiencing more deaths, illnesses and injuries from heatwaves, cyclones and other extreme weather events because of climate change.

According to the British Heart Foundation, particulate pollution, released by cars, fossil fuel power plants and other sources, will kill 160,000 Britons by 2030. Currently, it kills 11,000 Britons every year, and 3,000 Australians. Regulations on air pollution in Australia are very lax, and environmentalists and health experts alike are calling for reforms. Here in Australia, we also experienced grievous respiratory health impacts during the bushfire crisis, with asthmatics being particularly vulnerable, but also people on both ends of the age spectrum and pregnant women.

Furthermore, climate change exacerbates the spread of disease, especially in developing countries. It helps to spread Ebola in West Africa: long dry seasons followed by sudden rain make fruit grow suddenly and abundantly, bringing bats, apes and other carriers together and allowing the virus to jump between species. Then humans come into contact with these animals, through the illegal wildlife trade, some other physical means or a mosquito which bit one of the animals. But developed countries such as Australia are not safe. According to the CSIRO, "Habitat loss caused by deforestation, forest fires, and droughts that may be linked to climate change can result in fruit bats moving into more densely populated areas in search of food and water, increasing the chance of transmission." While we have little data on endemic infectious diseases in Australia to work with in relation to these complex changes in climate, we can still track the correlations between disease impacts and changing weather patterns, and then link these back to climate change. In 2009, Timothy J Inglis, a scientist from the Queen Elizabeth II Medical Centre, Perth, said in an article for NPS Medicinewise, "A recent investigation found that rainfall, temperature and high tides were determinants of Ross River virus transmission, but that the nature and scale of the interrelationship between disease, mosquito density and climate variability varied with geographic location and socioeconomic conditions. A predictive model based on surveillance data from Darwin found that a combination of rainfall, minimum temperature and three mosquito species predicted disease prevalence effectively. The model indicated that climate change may result in increased Ross River virus infections." (It is important to note that the 'recent' investigation is no longer recent, but still relevant, of course.)

I am sure you already know these figures, but I would like to remind you that the only real way to deal with these health problems is a transition to renewable energy and a radical decrease in carbon emissions.

Anthony Albanese - Leader of the Labor Party

I have sent this letter to you, Mr Albanese, because you are the leader of the opposition and I believe the situation requires bipartisan support for a green economic recovery plan, as I discuss in further detail in my letter. I hope that you will not see this as an opportunity for further argument and competition across party lines, but rather as a chance to work together for the common good of Australia.

Terri Butler - Shadow Minister for the Environment and Water

I believe the situation requires bipartisan support for a green economic recovery plan, as I discuss in further detail in my letter. As the Shadow Minister for Environment and Water, you would know that climate change increases the risk of droughts and catastrophic flooding. In order to protect our water reservoirs and river systems - many of which suffered in our last drought, ending in the bushfire season - we must address climate change, and that means taking action with concrete policies.

Joel Fitzgibbon - Shadow Minister for Agriculture and Resources

I believe the situation requires bipartisan support for a green economic recovery plan, as I discuss in further detail in my letter. Being the Shadow Minister for Agriculture and Resources, both of your ministerial duties are directly related to climate change, and as we have just been through a horrendous drought and bushfire season during which this fact became extremely poignant, I doubt that I need to remind you of the detrimental impacts the climate-driven drought had on the agricultural sector; of the important role farmers have to play themselves in reducing greenhouse gas emissions; and of the need to use our abundant renewable resources instead of digging up more dangerous fossil fuels.

Mark Butler - Shadow Minister for Climate Change and Energy

I believe the situation requires bipartisan support for a green economic recovery plan, as I discuss in further detail in my letter. I have of course sent this letter to you, minister, because it primarily concerns anthropogenic climate change, solutions, and energy usage.

Richard Marles - Deputy Leader of the Labor Party and Shadow Minister for Defence

I believe the situation requires bipartisan support for a green economic recovery plan, as I discuss in further detail in my letter. I have sent this letter to you, minister, because you are the Deputy Leader of the Labor Party, and therefore if Labor were to come to power you would be responsible for aiding the Prime Minister in undertaking the renewable energy transition of Australia, which I describe in more detail below. While my letter makes no mention of the military, climate change is an issue which I believe everyone should be acutely aware of. It may even prove to be a threat to national security.

When people talk about climate change, the last thing they think of it the Defence Force. However, there is a surprising link between military conflict and climate-related disasters, particularly in developing countries. As far back as 2007, then UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon was talking about 'climate wars.' A study from 2009 titled, "Warming increases the risk of civil war in Africa," stated that, "We find strong historical linkages between civil war and temperature in Africa, with warmer years leading to significant increases in the likelihood of war. When combined with climate model projections of future temperature trends, this historical response to temperature suggests a roughly 54% increase in armed conflict incidence by 2030, or an additional 393,000 battle deaths if future wars are as deadly as recent wars." This is due to the fact that increased temperatures can lead to drought, causing wars to break out over access to food and water, among other things. Many studies have been conducted since then, one of the latest by Denver University in 2019, and although there are factors which are more likely to result in war in the short term than climate change, it will likely prove to be a serious long-term security threat. A study from earlier in 2019 by the International Committee of the Red Cross studied patterns of violence related to climate in Mali, an African country which is part of the Sahel region, which is warming 1.5 times faster than the rest of the world and is thus more vulnerable to the effects of climate change. The ICRC's president, Peter Maurer, remarked that climate change "adds a complicating layer in a region where underdevelopment, endemic poverty, widespread criminality and violence already make life so fragile." Mali's death count in 2018 was more than five times higher than 2016, and this was found to be due to limited resources being fought over by farmers, such as food, land and water.

While these conflicts are in general restricted to developing countries, as the climate crisis continues to escalate these patterns of violence may begin to spread to our shores.

I am sure that you are already aware of these threats, but I would like to bring them to your attention once again, to remind you that no matter what walk of life we come from, climate change is relevant to us all. I implore you to consider climate change as a serious threat to national security, and help scientists and activists like myself to bring about greater public awareness of climate change, and more concrete government policies to deal with it.

Penny Wong - Shadow minister for foreign affairs

I believe the situation requires bipartisan support for a green economic recovery plan, as I discuss in further detail in my letter. When it comes to dealing with climate change, the department of Foreign Affairs has a vital role to play. For example, reducing greenhouse gas emissions on a global scale requires international cooperation and negotiation, whether that means flying across the world to attend a climate conference or travelling a shorter distance from home to Pacific Island Nations. The recent conference which occurred there was disappointing for many people, as it revealed that the Australian government was not willing to budge on the coal industry, and instead our Prime Minister avoided the questions and tried not to make any promises. The Prime Minister of Tonga was reduced to tears because his people, and others, are in real and present danger from climate change, due to rising sea levels. The islands are, in total, responsible only for 0.03% of global emissions, compared to Australia at approximately 1.07%. So although us cutting our emissions through a renewable energy transition wouldn't make a huge difference, it would be a show of solidarity with our neighbours which, if you look at the figures, could be achieved without creating economic meltdown. We are also experiencing climate change's sting in Australia, thanks to our last bushfire season, so I am asking you, minister, to please help Australia create a more concrete climate policy and take action.

Adam Bandt - Leader of the Greens

I have sent this letter to you because I would like to include the Greens in the loop with this project I have undertaken. I do not have any political affiliations, but I have seen and admired a few of your speeches. I trust The Greens will continue to support climate action, and help to educate the public about why it is necessary. I hope that you will appreciate the work that has gone into my letter which required a great amount of discipline, commitment and deep research, and only possible because of the incredible work of scientists around the world. I may not be a scientist myself, but I can try to spread their message as best I can.

Mehreen Faruqi - Greens Senator for NSW

I have sent this letter to you because I would like to include the Greens in the loop with this project I have undertaken, and also because you are my local Greens Senator; I live in NSW and I am proud of my state, but I wish that we were taking greater action with renewable energy. Currently, roughly 94% of our energy comes from non-renewable resources, and I feel that as a state we can do better than this. I hope that you will appreciate the work that has gone into my letter which required a great amount of discipline, commitment and deep research, and only possible because of the incredible work of scientists around the world. I may not be a scientist myself, but I can try to spread their message as best I can.


Recipients

M = Ministry

OM = Outer Ministry

PS = Parliamentary Secretaries

OPL = Other Politicians

OPE = Other People


M - Scott Morrison

Prime Minister

M - Ken Wyatt

Minister for Indigenous Affairs

M - Josh Frydenberg

Treasurer

M - Michael McCormack

Deputy PM and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development

M - Dan Tehan

Minister for Education

M - Sussan Ley

Minister for the Environment

M - Linda Reynolds

Minister for Defence

M - Darren Chester

Minister for Defence Personnel and Veterans' Affairs

M - Christian Porter

Attorney-General and Minister for Industrial Relations

M - Marise Payne

Minister for Foreign Affairs and Minister for Women

M - Alan Tudge

Minister for Population, Cities and Urban Infrastructure

M - Simon Birmingham

Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment

M - Michaelia Cash

Minister for Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business

M - Angus Taylor

Minister for Energy and Emissions Reduction

M - Stuart Robert

Minister for National Disability Insurance Scheme and Government Services

M - Paul Fletcher

Minister for Communications, Cyber Safety and the Arts

M - Mathias Cormann

Leader of the Senate and Minister for Finance

M - David Littleproud

Minister for Agriculture, Drought and Emergency Management

M - Peter Dutton

Minister for Home Affairs

M - Karen Andrews

Minister for Industry, Science and Technology

M - Keith Pitt

Minister for Resources, Water and Northern Australia

M - Anne Ruston

Minister for Families and Social Services

M - Greg Hunt

Minister for Health and Assisting the Prime Minister for Public Service and the Cabinet

OM - Mark Coulton

Regional Health, Regional Communications and Local Government

OM - Michael Sukkar

Assistant Treasurer and Minister for Housing

OM - Richard Colbeck

Minister for Aged Care and Senior Australians and Minister for Youth and Sport

OM - Andrew Gee

Minister Assisting the Minister for Trade and Investment and Minister for Decentralisation and Regional Education

OM - Alex Hawke

Minister for International Development and the Pacific and Assistant Defence Minister

OM - Melissa Price

Minister for the Defence Industry

OM - David Coleman

Minister for Immigration, Citizenship, Migrant Services and Multicultural Affairs

PS - Ben Morton

Assistant Minister to the Prime Minister and Cabinet

PS - Luke Howarth

Assistant Minister for Community Housing, Homelessness and Community Services

PS - Scott Buchholz

Assistant Minister for Road Safety and Freight Transport

PS - Jane Hume

Assistant Minister for Superannuation, Financial Services and Financial Technology

PS - Trevor Evans

Assistant Minister for Waste Reduction and Environmental Management

PS - Jason Wood

Assistant Minister for Customs, Community Safety and Multicultural Affairs

PS - Kevin Hogan

Assistant Minister to the Deputy Prime Minister

PS - Zed Seselja

Assistant Minister for Finance, Charities and Electoral Matters

PS - Michelle Landry

Assistant Minister for Children and Families and Assistant Minister for Northern Australia

PS - Steve Irons

Assistant Minister for Vocational Education, Training and Apprenticeships

PS - Nola Marino

Assistant Minister for Regional Development and Territories

PS - Jonathon Duniam

Assistant Minister for Forestry and Fisheries and Assistant Minister for Regional Tourism

OPL - Anthony Albanese

Leader of the Labor Party

OPL - Terri Butler

Shadow Minister for the Environment and Water

OPL - Joel Fitzgibbon

Shadow Minister for Agriculture and Resources

OPL - Mark Butler

Shadow Minister for Climate Change and Energy

OPL - Richard Marles

Deputy Leader of the Labor Party and Shadow Minister for Defence

OPL - Penny Wong

Shadow Minister for Foreign Affairs

OPL - Adam Bandt

Leader of the Greens

OPL - Mehreen Faruqi

Greens Senator for NSW

OPE - Amanda McKenzie and Tim Flannery

CEO and Contributor (respectively) of Climate Council

OPE - Greenpeace

Environmental Organisation

OPE - AYCC

Environmental Organisation

OPE - United Nations Youth, Australia

Branch of the United Nations

OPE - Emma Johnston

Dean of Science at UNSW

OPE - Australian Conservation Foundation

Environmental Organisation


(Many other people have been sent this letter but it is not appropriate to reveal their personal details here.)


Sources

PLEASE NOTE! Not all these sources are equally valuable. I have arranged them in chronological order and labelled them all for anyone's perusal.

Cited papers:

CSIRO - Low Emissions Technology Roadmap - June 2017

https://www.csiro.au/en/Do-business/Futures/Reports/Energy-and-Resources/Low-Emissions-Technology-Roadmap

International Labour Organisation - World Employment and Social Outlook 2018: Greening with jobs - Early 2018

https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---dgreports/---dcomm/---publ/documents/publication/wcms_628654.pdf

(Ernst and Young) ABC - More jobs in renewable-led COVID-19 economic recovery, EY [Ernst & Young] report finds - 7th June 2020

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-06-07/renewable-led-covid-19-recovery-will-create-more-jobs-ey-report/12322104

Oxfam - AUSTRALIA’S ENERGY FUTURE & THE RECOVERY FROM COVID-19: How we can help end poverty and fight the climate crisis - June 2020

https://www.oxfam.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/200623-GasClimate-Report-AustraliaS-Energy-Future-Recovery-From-COVID-19.pdf

IEA + IMF - Sustainable Recovery: World Energy Outlook Special Report - June 2020

https://www.iea.org/reports/sustainable-recovery

(200 English business leaders' letter)

The Guardian - Top business leaders call on Boris Johnson to set out green recovery plan - 1st June 2020

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/jun/01/top-business-leaders-call-on-boris-johnson-to-set-out-green-recovery-plan

Business Green - Over 200 British firms urge government to align economic recovery with net zero climate goal - 1st June 2020

https://www.businessgreen.com/news/4015865/200-british-firms-urge-government-align-economic-recovery-net-zero-climate-goal

News Articles and organisation blogs:

Nature Is Our Capital: Sir David Attenborough and Christine Lagarde - IMF - 2nd May 2019

https://www.imf.org/en/News/Podcasts/All-Podcasts/2019/05/02/nature-is-our-capital

Global Fossil Fuel Subsidies Remain Large: An Update Based on Country-Level Estimates - IMF - 2nd May 2019

https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/WP/Issues/2019/05/02/Global-Fossil-Fuel-Subsidies-Remain-Large-An-Update-Based-on-Country-Level-Estimates-46509

How the International Monetary Fund Is Waking Up to the Financial Risks of the Climate Crisis - World Resources Institute - 6th May 2019

https://www.wri.org/blog/2019/05/how-international-monetary-fund-waking-financial-risks-climate-crisis

GenCost 2019-20: preliminary results for stakeholder review - CSIRO - December 2019

https://www.aemo.com.au/-/media/Files/Electricity/NEM/Planning_and_Forecasting/Inputs-Assumptions-Methodologies/2019/CSIRO-GenCost2019-20_DraftforReview.pdf

Australia Country Scorecard - CCPI (Climate Change Performance Index) - 2020

https://www.climate-change-performance-index.org/country/australia

With costs approaching $100 billion, the bushfires are Australia’s costliest natural disaster - news.com.au - 17th January 2020

https://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/australian-economy/with-costs-approaching-100-billion-the-bushfires-are-australias-costliest-natural-disaster/news-story/3c5fd4f7dabacc896cecd0167095d4b8

New CSIRO, AEMO study confirms wind, solar and storage beat coal, gas and nuclear - Renew Economy - 6th February 2020

https://reneweconomy.com.au/new-csiro-aemo-study-confirms-wind-solar-and-storage-beat-coal-gas-and-nuclear-57530

Renewable Natural Gas - CIC (Climate Investigations Centre) - 9th February 2020

https://climateinvestigations.org/renewable-natural-gas/

Mike Cannon-Brookes slams Scott Morrison's plan to invest in technology but not climate change - Daily Mail Australia - 20th February 2020

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8022227/Mike-Cannon-Brookes-slams-Scott-Morrisons-plan-invest-technology-not-climate-change.html

Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index (RECAI) - Ernest & Young - May 2020

https://www.ey.com/en_uk/recai

Leaked Covid-19 commission report calls for Australian taxpayers to underwrite gas industry expansion - The Guardian - 21st May 2020

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/may/21/leaked-covid-19-commission-report-calls-for-australian-taxpayers-to-underwrite-gas-industry-expansion

Coalition pushes gas over coal in energy roadmap but critics say it will drive climate change - SBS - 21st May 2020

https://www.sbs.com.au/news/coalition-pushes-gas-over-coal-in-energy-roadmap-but-critics-say-it-will-drive-climate-change

Gas lobby seizes Covid moment, and declares war on Australia’s future - Renew Economy - 22nd May 2020

https://reneweconomy.com.au/gas-lobby-seizes-covid-moment-and-declares-war-on-australias-future-60077

Business, unions and green groups call for sustainable Covid-19 recovery with clean energy transition - The Guardian - 22nd May 2020

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/may/22/australian-government-urged-to-back-sustainable-covid-19-recovery-with-clean-energy-transition

Coronavirus: Australia’s post-COVID economic recovery plan ‘doesn’t make sense’ - news.com.au - 23rd May 2020

https://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/australian-economy/coronavirus-australias-postcovid-economic-recovery-plan-doesnt-make-sense/news-story/35816ed0e92ae62bd9b5c971a0ed7a67

RN Presents Hot Mess - ABC Radio National - 24th May 2020

https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/hot-mess/

Australian business and environmental groups push for cleaner economy post-coronavirus - SBS - 25th May 2020

https://www.sbs.com.au/news/australian-business-and-environmental-groups-push-for-cleaner-economy-post-coronavirus

A single mega-project exposes the Morrison government’s gas plan as staggering folly - The Conversation - 27th May 2020

https://theconversation.com/a-single-mega-project-exposes-the-morrison-governments-gas-plan-as-staggering-folly-133435

Coronavirus economic recovery committee looks set to push Australia towards gas-fired future - ABC News - 28th May 2020

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-13/coronavirus-recovery-to-push-australia-towards-gas-future/12239978

Equity Investors Must Pay More Attention to Climate Change Physical Risk - IMF - 29th May 2020

https://blogs.imf.org/2020/05/29/equity-investors-must-pay-more-attention-to-climate-change-physical-risk/

COVID-19 is hastening the green economy, and we are far behind - CBC - 31st May 2020

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/opinion-oates-green-economy-1.5588836

Renewables Overtake Coal, But Lag Far Behind Oil And Natural Gas - Forbes - 31st May 2020

https://www.forbes.com/sites/rrapier/2020/05/31/renewables-overtake-coal-but-lag-far-behind-oil-and-natural-gas/#6cd06c623ffd

Make Covid-19 recovery green, say business leaders - BBC - 1st June 2020

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-52851185

Finally there is real movement on Australia's climate policy but time isn’t on our side - The Guardian - 1st June 2020

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/commentisfree/2020/jun/01/finally-there-is-real-movement-on-australias-climate-policy-but-time-isnt-on-our-side

Nev Power distances COVID-19 commission from gas-led recovery plan - Financial Review - 4th June 2020

https://www.afr.com/politics/federal/nev-power-distances-covid-19-commission-from-gas-led-recovery-plan-20200604-p54zhf

Covid-19 relief for fossil fuel industries risks green recovery plans - The Guardian - 6th June 2020

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jun/06/covid-19-relief-for-fossil-fuel-industries-risks-green-recovery-plans

Covid-19 relief for fossil fuel industries risks green recovery plans - The Guardian - 6th June 2020

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jun/06/covid-19-relief-for-fossil-fuel-industries-risks-green-recovery-plans

Renewables surpass coal in US energy generation for first time in 130 years - Grist - 7th June 2020

https://grist.org/energy/renewables-surpass-coal-in-us-energy-generation-for-first-time-in-130-years/

Industry backs calls for renewables to lead Australia back to prosperity - ABC News - 7th June 2020

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-06-07/renewable-led-covid-19-recovery-will-create-more-jobs-ey-report/12322104

Homebuilder misses a chance to make Australian homes perform better for us and the planet - The Guardian - 8th June 2020

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/jun/08/homebuilder-government-recnovation-grants-australian-homes-energy-efficiency

Jobs come first in South Korea's ambitious 'Green New Deal' climate plan - Reuters - 8th June 2020

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-southkorea-environment-newdeal-analys-idUSKBN23F0SV

'Everyone was watching': BlackRock is showing its hand on coal - Sydney Morning Herald - 8th June 2020

https://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/everyone-was-watching-blackrock-is-showing-its-hand-on-coal-20200605-p54zrx.html

Act now, or risk failure: why we must act faster on cleaner energy - News for the Oil and Gas Sector - Energy Voice - 8th June 2020

https://www.energyvoice.com/opinion/243959/act-now-or-risk-failure-why-we-must-act-faster-on-cleaner-energy/

Could the coronavirus crisis finally finish off coal? - BBC - 9th June 2020

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-52968716

Germany and hydrogen — €9 billion to spend as strategy is revealed - Deutsche Welle - 10th June 2020

https://www.dw.com/en/germany-and-hydrogen-7-billion-to-spend-but-no-strategy-yet/a-53719746?maca=en-gk_volltext_AppleNews_germany-16395-xml-atom

Home is where the water is - News Room - 12th June 2020

https://www.newsroom.co.nz/2020/06/12/1223341/home-is-where-the-water-is

BP takes $17.5B hit as pandemic accelerates emissions cuts - Boston Herald - 15th June 2020

https://www.bostonherald.com/2020/06/15/bp-takes-17-5b-hit-as-pandemic-accelerates-emissions-cuts/

Unilever's Australian CEO urges climate change focus in COVID-19 stimulus - The Sydney Morning Herald - 16th June 2020

https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/unilever-s-australian-ceo-urges-climate-change-focus-in-covid-19-stimulus-20200616-p552yp.html

3 Years and $3 Trillion Could Shift the Climate Change Narrative - Bloomberg Green - 18th June 2020

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-06-18/3-years-and-3-trillion-could-shift-the-climate-change-narrative

Australia's devotion to coal has come at a huge cost. We need the government to change course, urgently - The Conversation AU - 22nd June 2020

https://theconversation.com/australias-devotion-to-coal-has-come-at-a-huge-cost-we-need-the-government-to-change-course-urgently-140841

The federal government urged to steer clear of a gas-fired coronavirus recovery - Pro Bono - 24th June 2020

https://probonoaustralia.com.au/news/2020/06/the-federal-government-urged-to-steer-clear-of-a-gas-fired-coronavirus-recovery/

Ukraine flooding leaves three dead, hundreds homeless - Yahoo News - 25th June 2020

https://au.news.yahoo.com/ukraine-flooding-leaves-three-dead-hundreds-homeless-170734421--spt.html

This is how we can make a global green recovery – that also boosts the economy - World Economic Forum - 26th June 2020

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/06/sustainable-green-recovery-economy-boost-coronavirus

PANDEMIC: Electricity, COVID-19 and carbon: 3 issues to watch - E&E News - 26th June 2020

https://www.eenews.net/stories/1063454357?utm_campaign=eenews%3Afeed%3Aopen_stories&utm_medium=feed&utm_source=eenews%3Afeed

Their fate isn’t sealed: Pacific nations can survive climate change – if locals take the lead - The Conversation - 30th June 2020

https://theconversation.com/their-fate-isnt-sealed-pacific-nations-can-survive-climate-change-if-locals-take-the-lead-136709

Crises in sustainability and health will challenge PM's leadership in National Cabinet - Croakey - 1st July 2020

https://croakey.org/crises-in-sustainability-and-health-will-challenge-pms-leadership-in-national-cabinet/

Green stimulus could save millions in welfare payments: EY report - Sydney Morning Herald - 1st July 2020

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/green-stimulus-could-save-millions-in-welfare-payments-ey-report-20200630-p557of.html

Ukraine floods: Why climate change and logging are blamed - BBC - 2nd July 2020

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-53233387

Report lists the regional economies worst hit by COVID-19, suggests 'green' stimulus - ABC News - 2nd July 2020

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-07-01/hard-hit-covid-regions-benefit-from-green-stimulus-package/12408282

The fossil fuel lobby is running a concerted campaign to exploit this global health crisis to further their agenda - Fossil Fuel Watch - 3rd July 2020

https://fossilfuel.watch/


I have included the letter, list of sources and list of recipients, below as PDFs. If you wish to send them to another politician you may do so, but please contact me first, at green.news.australia@gmail.com, and credit 'Nicola Allen, editor of Green News Australia.' I am happy for you to do that as long as they are being used for a good cause.

Project Sunset - PDF
.pdf
Download PDF • 150KB
Sources
.pdf
Download PDF • 158KB
Recipients
.pdf
Download PDF • 124KB

This same thing can be found under the Resources tab, on the 'Open Letter to the PM' page: https://www.greennewsaustralia.com/open-letter-to-the-pm

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